USTC Adds Full Coverage of Estonian Printing, 1525-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

USTC Adds Full Coverage of Latvian Printing, 1525-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

Rare Notes on a Bestseller

By Hanna de Lange | Today, visitors from all over the globe know their way to Cambridge and all the sites to see there. These landmarks include Magdalene College’s Old Library and Pepys Library, both of which are PWRB partners. But how did early modern Europeans learn about Britain’s unique treasures and rich history? The […]

An Opportune Entryway: Erasmus and his Earliest Effort in Print

By Jacob Baxter | Bold new chapters can often arise out of the most awkward of circumstances. In the Houghton Library at Harvard University, one of our partners at Preserving the World’s Rarest Books, you will find a fascinating example of this: Robert Gaguin’s Compendium de origine et gestis Francorum (USTC 760882).[1] This incunabulum is […]

A Long Journey or False Imprint?

By Alba Malcangi | The title of this blog was the first question that arose while analyzing a particular edition of Petronius’ classical work of fiction, the Satyricon. This edition came to my attention while enriching the USTC with links to recently digitized items from ProQuest’s Early European Books, as part of my summer internship. […]

William Dowsing: Breaker of Idols and Marker of Books

By Nora Epstein | The entry in the Acts of the Privy Council of England for 1 October 1551 granted Dutch-born printer Reynolde Wolfe license to sell ‘…the booke lately by hym enprinted and set owt by the Archebysshop of Cauntorbury against Doctour Gardiner’s booke.’ The characteristically long title of the book licensed in this […]

A Deadly Vocation

By Andrew Pettegree | The writings of Martin Luther transformed the German print industry. At one point in the early 1520s, the writings of Luther and his supporters accounted for half of the books published in the Holy Roman Empire. So it bears emphasis that Luther’s movement in fact did not export very well. This […]

(CRRS), BR375.S26 1586

That Romish Fable Framer: Nicholas Sander’s Schismatis Anglicani

By Chelsea Reutcke | In an historical parallel to Game of Thrones, a book printed in 1585 claimed that Elizabeth I of England was the child of an ‘incestuous marriage’ as her mother, Anne Boleyn, was in fact the daughter of Henry VIII (and the king knew it). The book in question, Nicholas Sander’s De […]

Desiderius Erasmus, Scarabevs, Leuven: Theodoricvs Martinvs, 1517.

Looking for Digitized Works by Erasmus and his Contemporaries? Go to Lovaniensia.be

By Dr An Smets | In 2017 KU Leuven Libraries and the Bibliothèques de UCLouvain launched Lovaniensia.be, with financial support in the context of the cultural cooperation agreement between the Flemish and the French community. With this platform, both institutions wanted to make available material from the old academic collection, or Collectio academica antiqua (Caa). […]

Le sac de Lyon par les réformés calvinistes

Pamphleteering by Hand

By Panagiotis Georgakakis | The Bibliothèque de Rennes Métropole, one of our PWRB partners, is the home of a significant number of rare printed materials published during the sixteenth century. Yet, unexpectedly for this blog, today we will not be analysing a printed item in their collection. Rather, we will focus on a manuscript about […]