A Flight of Fancy

By Jacob Baxter | At 20.17 (GMT) on 20 July 1969, close to one billion people witnessed something extraordinary. Across the globe, millions of flickering TV screens showed a space capsule touching down on the Sea of Tranquillity, over 250,000 miles away from Earth. After an agonising six and a half hour wait, Neil Armstrong […]

USTC 606035.

Joking with Printed Images: Vesalius, Putti, and Courtly Ambition

By Richard Bellis | Andreas Vesalius’s 1543 work, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem (On the fabric of the human body in seven books, USTC 606035), is considered a landmark publication in the history of anatomy, because it provided the first comprehensive set of illustrations of the anatomy of the human body based on dissections […]

It’s all Gucci (and Gessner)

By Nora Epstein | Over the last millennia, Westminster Abbey has been the venue for coronations, royal weddings, and in summer of 2016, its first fashion show. The relatively new director of Gucci, Alessandro Michele, explained how his appreciation of English visual history inspired the collection and his choice of location. Michele’s vivid juxtaposition of […]

USTC Completes Full Survey of Icelandic Printing, 1534-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

The Tragic Martyrdom of Saint Ham and Saint Sausage

By Elise Watson | 1 April 2020 In honour of this auspicious day, the USTC is proud to announce a new and exciting discovery. Using heretofore unseen eyewitness records, we have learned that in 1521, Pope Leo X solemnly canonised holy two martyrs to be added to the pantheon of saints: Saint Jambon (Saint Ham) […]

Off to the Bar Chart Race(s): The Largest Print Centres Through Time (1450-1650)

By Graeme Kemp | Watch the race to be the largest European print centre, from the fifteenth century to the mid-seventeenth century. Graeme Kemp looks at how the centres for the production of books has shifted over time and how. Animated Bar Charts Some of the most viral visualisations of the last twelve months have […]

Vilniaus žemėlapis

USTC Adds Coverage of the Print Culture of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, 1522-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

Wrapped in Newspaper, or, an Experimental Binding for Robert Boyle’s Experiments

By Hanna de Lange | The Latin trade has long been considered a one-way-street: books in Latin were imported in England, mainly the classics. It rings true that publications printed on the British Isles were overwhelmingly in English and catered to the local market. But more than once authors and publishers sought readers and trading […]

Proclaiming the Dead: A Sole-Surviving Groningen Funeral Print

By Forrest Strickland | On 20 November 1615, the University of Groningen gathered to mourn the death of Eggricus Eggaeus Phebens. Phebens’ death was remembered in standard early modern tropes. His life, we are told, was one of piety, temperance, virtue and other laudable qualities. Temperance, honesty and modesty marked Pheben’s academic career: at the […]