A Deadly Vocation

By Andrew Pettegree | The writings of Martin Luther transformed the German print industry. At one point in the early 1520s, the writings of Luther and his supporters accounted for half of the books published in the Holy Roman Empire. So it bears emphasis that Luther’s movement in fact did not export very well. This … Read more

(CRRS), BR375.S26 1586

That Romish Fable Framer: Nicholas Sander’s Schismatis Anglicani

By Chelsea Reutcke | In an historical parallel to Game of Thrones, a book printed in 1585 claimed that Elizabeth I of England was the child of an ‘incestuous marriage’ as her mother, Anne Boleyn, was in fact the daughter of Henry VIII (and the king knew it). The book in question, Nicholas Sander’s De … Read more

UCL

University College London

University College London (UCL) was founded in 1826 as the University of London. It was established to open up education in England to students of any race or religion for the first time. The university library dates from 1829, and was reliant on benefactions for much of the nineteenth century. Several of the most important … Read more

Desiderius Erasmus, Scarabevs, Leuven: Theodoricvs Martinvs, 1517.

Looking for Digitized Works by Erasmus and his Contemporaries? Go to Lovaniensia.be

By Dr An Smets | In 2017 KU Leuven Libraries and the Bibliothèques de UCLouvain launched Lovaniensia.be, with financial support in the context of the cultural cooperation agreement between the Flemish and the French community. With this platform, both institutions wanted to make available material from the old academic collection, or Collectio academica antiqua (Caa). … Read more

USTC 2019 TEAM

USTC Hosts Twelfth Annual Book History Conference

By Arthur der Weduwen | Between Thursday 20 and Saturday 22 June, the USTC team hosted the twelfth annual St Andrews book history conference. Fifty-four scholars and students joined us for twenty-four papers on the subject of Crisis or Enlightenment? Developments in the Book Trade, 1650-1750. The conference attracted visitors from sixteen countries, from Colombia … Read more

Le sac de Lyon par les réformés calvinistes

Pamphleteering by Hand

By Panagiotis Georgakakis | The Bibliothèque de Rennes Métropole, one of our PWRB partners, is the home of a significant number of rare printed materials published during the sixteenth century. Yet, unexpectedly for this blog, today we will not be analysing a printed item in their collection. Rather, we will focus on a manuscript about … Read more

Jacopo de’ Barbari

The Lagoon City and the Book: Descriptions of Renaissance Venice

By Sandra Toffolo | The Fondazione Biblioteca San Bernardino in Trento, one of our Preserving the World’s Rarest Books library partners, is home to the books acquired over the centuries by the Franciscans in Trentino: around 25,000 books published prior to the nineteenth century, including over 300 incunabula and 3,600 books from the sixteenth century. Among … Read more

Sanders’ signature;

William Sanders: A Life of Science and Satire

Satire in Scotland Scientific disputes were not uncommon in the seventeenth century. However, some basic civilities had to be observed. When in 1667 James Gregory (c. 1638–1675), who held the first Regius Chair of Mathematics at the University of St Andrews, started a fight with the famous polymath Christiaan Huygens (1629–1695), the Royal Society had … Read more

the story of Cadmus, founder of Thebes.

(S)expurgation: Censoring images in Ovid’s Metamorphosis

By Jessica Farrell-Jobst | Within the collection of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies at the University of Toronto is a 1517 folio edition of Ovid’s Metamorphosis printed in Venice by Georgio Rusconi (USTC 763005). Metamorphosis was one of the most popular texts of the early modern period, having been printed in at least … Read more

shelfie

Setting an Example: the Bibliography of Conrad Gessner

By Hanna de Lange | In 1545 Zürich printer Christoph Froschauer published the Bibliotheca Universalis (USTC 616753) by Conrad Gessner (1516-1565). Like our own universal catalogue, the USTC, Gessner meticulously compiled a list of authors and their books, an undertaking that earned him the title ‘the father of bibliography’. Conrad Gessner was a Swiss polymath, … Read more