The Memory of Grievances Past

By Andrew Pettegree | For Protestantism, France was both the greatest prize and the greatest missed opportunity. For a few heady years in mid-century, it appeared, at least to members of the expanding Calvinist congregations, that the conversion of France was at hand. A decade later these hopes lay in tatters, the dying embers snuffed […]

Christ vs Antichrist: Comparing Actions in Religious Polemical Print

By Jessica G. Purdy | Printed religious and political polemic was a mainstay of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. In the aftermath of the Reformation, Protestants pitted themselves against Catholics and juxtaposed their stances on almost every aspect of doctrine possible. These conflicts were often played out in the form of printed propaganda, and innumerable […]

Jesuits vs Libertines, or a Clash of Cultures in 17th Century France

By Christopher Davis | J’estimerois ma langue et ma plume criminelles de lèze-Majesté si je ne les armais contre ce monstre de libertinage.[1] This ill-written doorstop of a quarto, masquerading as a work of erudition, was penned between December 1622 and March 1623 by the Jesuit François Garasse and published in August 1623 in Paris […]

From Naples to Barcelona: Catholic Propaganda in the Spanish Empire

By Laura Incollingo | When the Catholic Reformation’s relationship with print is discussed, the focus tends to be placed on their censorship and prohibition efforts. However, the Catholic Church did more than curtail Europe’s vibrant print networks, they capitalized from it. Although somewhat later than their Protestant adversaries, during the early modern period the Roman […]

Matchmaking without a Date: the Survival of a Popular French Romance

By Isabelle Riquet | Within book history, the Bonfons publishing dynasty is often used as an example for the problems that arise from judging print output on extant copies. Survival bias affects our picture of the Bonfons’ output more than most because they made a name for themselves by printing works aimed toward a popular […]

Interview with a Demon: Exorcism and Sensational Pamphlets in Loudun

By Elise Watson | Happy Halloween! Our spooky subject this week is the controversial affair of demonic possession in an Ursuline convent in Loudun, France, which circulated throughout the 1630s in popular pamphlets. Demonic possession was a common fear in the early modern period, and women and members of religious orders were seen as particularly […]

USTC Adds Full Coverage of Finnish Printing, 1642-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

USTC Adds Full Coverage of Estonian Printing, 1525-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

USTC Adds Full Coverage of Latvian Printing, 1525-1650

By Arthur der Weduwen | Over the past year, the USTC team has made it a priority to expand its coverage of national print cultures that have thus far been underrepresented in our database. When printing emerged in the fifteenth century it spread quickly throughout Western and Southern Europe, but failed to settle in broad […]

Rare Notes on a Bestseller

By Hanna de Lange | Today, visitors from all over the globe know their way to Cambridge and all the sites to see there. These landmarks include Magdalene College’s Old Library and Pepys Library, both of which are PWRB partners. But how did early modern Europeans learn about Britain’s unique treasures and rich history? The […]