Matchmaking without a Date: the Survival of a Popular French Romance

By Isabelle Riquet | Within book history, the Bonfons publishing dynasty is often used as an example for the problems that arise from judging print output on extant copies. Survival bias affects our picture of the Bonfons’ output more than most because they made a name for themselves by printing works aimed toward a popular […]

USTC 6030412, title page

Circulating Scandalous News in Early Modern Europe

By Sandra Toffolo | In 1637 in Grenoble Magdeleine d’Auvermont was accused of adultery by relatives of her husband: she had given birth to a son, but her husband had been away in Germany for the past four years. This was according to a pamphlet published in Paris that same year. Magdeleine, however, claimed that […]

Binding for Cicero's Letters

Saving Your Textbooks: Cicero’s importance to scholars of all ages

By Jamie Cumby | In 1578 a collection of Cicero’s letters was printed in Paris. As a new academic year begins, Preserving the World’s Rarest Books is highlighting a copy of this early modern educational book at Merton College Library in Oxford, one of our library partners (75.E.8(4)).  Gabriel Buon, printer of the edition, gave […]

Charlotte Guillard - Paris printer

Charlotte Guillard: One of Paris’ First Woman Printers

By Jamie Cumby and Panagiotis Georgakakis | This week’s post brings together several themes in the sixteenth-century scholarly book world – printing in classical languages, women printers, legal humanism – via a single copy of a work by Emperor Justinian I.  This work (USTC 140698) was printed in Paris in 1542 by Charlotte Guillard, one of […]